Is lorazepam good for alcohol withdrawal?

lorazepam good for alcohol withdrawalAlcohol consumption is a common practice and it is not a surprising fact that, the cases of alcohol withdrawal are faced very frequently by health personnel. Alcohol withdrawal is a life threatening condition which occurs following heavy drinking for weeks. It can worsen quickly and pose a medical emergency. Most cases of alcohol withdrawal do not require hospitalization, but in severe cases, it may be unavoidable.

A lot of treatment modalities have been tried and tested for alcohol withdrawal. All of them have their own pros and cons. However, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam etc.) remain the main treatment of choice for alcohol withdrawal.

Why alcohol withdrawal occurs?

When a person drinks heavily, the alcohol interferes with neuro transmission in the brain. It suppresses the activity of GABA (a neurotransmitter causing calming effect) and glutamate (a neurotransmitter having simulative effect).

Following prolonged consumption, if a person suddenly stops taking alcohol, the inhibitory effect of alcohol will no longer be there. This may in turn cause hyper excitability within the brain known as Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome.

How does lorazepam can treat alcohol withdrawal?

Lorazepam which is otherwise known as ativan corrects the chemical imbalance in the brain, which may be caused due to different conditions, one of which is alcohol withdrawal. Taking ativan increases the effect of GABA in the nervous system that produce calming effect on the body. They in turn relieve delirium tremors, anxiety and confusion which are observed in alcohol withdrawal. This significantly reduces the chances of progression of the condition.

Before buying ativan online, let us compare lorazepam with other benzodiazepines in terms of their role in alcohol withdrawal!

According to research, the drug of choice remains diazepam, one of the longer acting benzodiazepines. Its effect starts very early and remains effective for longer periods of time. This in turn prevents the recurrence of seizure or tremors. Compared to it, the lorazepam takes longer time to produce its effect and remains for a much shorter period then diazepam. Therefore it is clear that there will be instances that you may feel the withdrawal symptoms again after the effect of lorazepam slowly beings to vain off.

Lorazepam is used as continuous IV infusion. It takes about twenty minutes to take effect. So if you don’t have any experience working with lorazepam, you tend to take more in hope of early effect. During infusion, lorazepam may accumulate in the body and produce over sedation. There are also chances of propylene glycol intoxication (if lorazepam infusion is being given) with lorazepam.

When is lorazepam preferred over alcohol withdrawal?

Cirrhosis of liver is common among alcoholics. For these patients, it is important to use a shorter acting benzodiazepine. With a deteriorated liver function, the metabolism of medicine significant slows down and the medication tends to remain in the body for longer periods of time. It may also cause a prolonged effect on the drug, which may be harmful for the patient. Loarazepam being a short acting drug and the most suitable for someone with advanced liver cirrhosis.

To summarize the answer in short, although benzodiazepine is a drug of choice for alcohol withdrawal, lorazepam is less frequently preferred compared to its long acting congeners like diazepam.